Recruitment

Top 10 benefits of e-recruitment

Top 10 Benefits of E-Recruitment

Top 10 Benefits of E-Recruitment 1200 628 HR-ON

The traditional methods of recruitment require far too much paperwork and time. Consequently, from the job posting to the employment, e-recruitment could be the solution to streamline the entire process. In fact, time and resources can be relocated for prioritizing the development of talent and strengthening your employees’ morale. Having the right tools and implementing an e-recruitment software could save cost, time and attract specialists, who would drive more growth and productivity into the company. Learn why in this top 10 benefits of e-recruitment:

#1 Time-saving

No matter where you are, you can send out job postings anytime with Internet access. In other words, you can forget about the paperwork and the action of entering data manually. As a result, it will not only save time for HR managers, but by retrieving files from LinkedIn, the process of application will speed up.

#2 Dynamic content

Generate dynamic content could build up your employer branding in a successful way to attract top talents and to boost corporate culture. Use your social media account to spread the word and to attract more traffic to both your website and social media accounts.

#3 Minimized hiring cost

Labor costs in recruiting are usually high in terms of advertising, travel expenses, third-party recruiter fees etc. As a result, the hiring process usually takes up too much time and its cost could be minimized by implementing a software which allows you to post free job openings on multiple social platforms just by one click.

#4 Effective

Online recruitment is easily accessible to individuals, making it a more effective method of getting your posts noticed. Online job ads can be posted within few minutes and they can be easily posted on several social media platform with no waste of time.

#5 Shorten hiring process

The hiring process could be shortened by just clicking a few buttons to screen, filter, and sort applicants data and CV. Online recruiting streamlines the process of inviting or rejecting applicants one by one and inserting applicants’ data manually is no longer needed.

#6 Accessible

Job ads and campaigns can be released through various social media platforms reaching the specific target group.

#7 Broader scope for candidates

By using recruitment software, recruiters will be helped in reaching a wider amount of candidates locally and abroad. Moreover, statistical analysis will be essential for recruiters to track where applicants have seen the job advertisements.

#8 Personalized design

Your professional career page is tailored made accordingly to the graphical identity of the company. As a result, this will help your employer branding, underlining the company’s identity and values.

You can read more about employer branding here.

#9 Filtration tools

Recruitment systems have filtration tools to help recruiters to find the ideal candidates with competencies that match the job position. Therefore, the filtration tools provided by e-recruitment systems speed up the process of sorting the candidates according to experience, education, competencies, and many more criteria.

#10 Flexible and easy

There is no hassle in learning how to use an e-recruitment system. So, it is easy to use and provides a platform where all the HR managers could follow the hiring process. Moreover, the cloud-based feature allows the employer to have a CV database with no limits and to be GDPR-compliant.

GDPR is stressing you? Try our risk assessment tool

Did you liked this Top 10 Benefits of E-Recruitment? If so, take a look and learn more about the products we offer to help your company’s HR tasks here.

Valu-based reruitment

Value-Based Recruitment – A Developer’s Perspective

Value-Based Recruitment – A Developer’s Perspective 700 250 HR-ON

I got to thinking about what value-based recruitment really means for the HR-ON system and for the developers’ work.

Often, we talk about value-based recruitment in connection to the interpersonal process that lies on top of the recruitment platform itself. But since the recruitment platform is the foundation of the entire recruitment process, the value-based element must be not only reflected in it, but directly supported and encouraged.

A value-based approach

Let me give you a very concrete example of how we can see the value-based approach to the recruitment process in HR-ON. In many systems, you pre-screen your candidates.  In some systems you can give a candidate either a thumbs up, thumbs down or thumb to the side. At HR-ON, we use a star system. Some people may receive more stars than others, but none should be directly negatively assessed – they simply do not fit the criteria. 

This may seem like an insignificant thing, but it can actually affect the recruitment culture within an organization. By having the option to give candidates a negative thumbs down, this also allows you to see which candidates have the most thumbs down icons. And therefore such a system brings attention to not only the best candidate but also the worst. In other words, the focus is changed slightly and the system allows for negative reviews.

Care in the system

Facebook has long refused to insert a dislike button into their system. They do this because Facebook has to be seen as a neutral place, not allowing for any discrimination or negative attitudes. They therefore do not want to contribute to the cruelty that a dislike button could bring. This is wise, and it’s similar for a recruitment system. We must encourage a positive and evolving recruitment culture, focusing on the candidates’ values and knowledge. Not the opposite! 

It does matter to our minds and brains when we act positively instead of negatively. Our brains are built to reward positive behaviour. That’s why we don’t thrive in environments where we have to act or respond negatively to other people – we tend to get stressed. 

Star system

So that’s why we use a star system at HR-ON. Eventually, you end up with a number of candidates who have not been awarded stars. They are left as neutral applicants who simply did not meet our criteria. And the system does not encourage us to look at or laugh at the worst candidates.

This shows care and adds value to the recruitment system. The system encourages us to focus only on the candidates who scored highest.

HR-ON holder oplæg om GDPR og rekruttering

HR-ON customers gather to hear an update on GDPR and Recruitment

HR-ON customers gather to hear an update on GDPR and Recruitment 1200 800 HR-ON

Almost a hundred users of HR-ON showed up to hear how the system, in the future, can ensure that their recruitment complies with the new EU Personal Data Regulations (GDPR).

With the EU’s new Personal Data Regulations (GDPR) coming into force, Danish companies must pay close attention to data protection relating to recruitment. It was therefore, not surprising that HR-ON’s GDPR seminar was extremely popular. In fact, extra chairs had to be brought in to accommodate the almost 100 people who came to the seminar.

After everyone had arrived, and found a seat, Ali Cevik, Director of HR-ON, along with most of HR-ON’s staff, welcomed the participants.

Applications and CVs are packed with sensitive data

The new GDPR rules place strict requirements on the documentation of how companies process sensitive, personal information. Candidate applications are of course full of personal information, and GDPR threatens with significantly higher fines for companies that are not in control of their data. Which is one more reason why many companies are nervous about how they will abide by these new GDPR rules, explained Christian Højer Schjøler, Assistant Professor at SDU.

The first speaker of the day asked the audience if they would like to hear a little about the fines, and from their reaction it would seem this is a crucial topic.

“Before the EU’s new Personal Data Regulations came into place, in Denmark you could risk having a fine of between 2000 and 25,000 DKK if you violate the Personal Data Act. Now, the fines could be up to 20 million euros, or four percent of the company’s annual turnover, for both public and private organizations. These significantly higher fines are now in place,” he said.

Many grey areas

From a legal point of view, there are still many grey areas in relation to the law. For example, according to Christian Højer Schjøler, it is not yet known how the fines will affect public organizations. Should the state pay fines to the state? What is clear, is that the fines must be significant enough to strongly discourage companies from violating the new regulations. 

“It must have a deterrent effect,” said Christian Højer Schjøler.

In terms of the information that companies provide to candidates, it is written in the new GDPR rules that this must be in easily understandable language. It cannot be like the mile long terms and conditions that we are often asked to accept online. Basically, companies need to get used to the fact that there is a lot of information which they are no longer allowed to store:

“We have to go from ‘nice to have’ to ‘need to have’,” the lawyer admonished. 

HR-ON is ready for the Personal Data Regulation

When it comes to recruiting, however, there are many things that are already very clear. This was explained by HR-ON’s Head of Concept and Development, Christian Hansen, as he subsequently spoke about the new GDPR laws which are relevant to recruitment.

He explained exactly how HR-ON will solve the challenges of classifying the large amount of data that naturally occurs during a recruitment process. In fact, HR-ON will help companies in relation to their disclosure requirements. He also discussed how HR-ON will ensure that all activities in relation to personal data is logged. He informed the audience that HR-ON is certified in the handling of recruitment data according to GDPR. 

During the seminar, time was set aside for the many attending companies to network. There were also plenty of opportunities to have a chat over a cup of coffee.

Many new initiatives in HR-ON

Before the day came to an end, Ali Cevik and System Developer, Lennard M. Sørensen, gave a presentation on behalf of HR-ON about GDPR and Recruitment. 

Among other things, they informed the audience of the possibilities of signing with digital signatures, retrieving candidates directly from LinkedIn, HR-ON’s news feed and the use of social media. They had a final feedback round, where the daily users if the system could brainstorm new ideas.

HR-ON remains a system designed to facilitate corporate life in a wide range of areas, which now has additional features to help companies adhere to the new GDPR laws, specifically in relation to recruitment. 

 

Click here to read about HR-ON’s focus onVærdibaseret rekruttering

briller

See recruitment through the eyes of an applicant

See recruitment through the eyes of an applicant 715 217 HR-ON

Morten Agerbæk Riber from Odense, is 27 years old and educated in Communication. In his spare time, he enjoys playing squash, being a barista, creating crooked DIYs and travelling abroad with his girlfriend. His life is pretty good – The only things missing is that he doesn’t yet have a permanent job.

Morton has done a number of temp and contract jobs, however, he is still actively seeking a  permanent position, so that he can get out of the unemployment benefit system completely. Since Morten graduated in 2014, he has been busy applying:

“I have applied for about 200 jobs, so I have gradually formed an opinion on what a good recruitment process is,” he says. 

Along with the job search, Morten has been in various internships and salary subsidy positions. He has also worked on improving his professional profile through courses:

“I really want to work with digital communications and have therefore taken courses in Google Analytics and Adwords.”

Vague and unrealistic job descriptions

“One thing I’ve come to realize during my job search is that companies often use clichés, or just list a lot of things they want you to be able to do. It’s rare that I come across a job description that is really targeted and specific,” he says, exemplifying:

“If I read a job description posted by a small library in the outskirts of Denmark and they write: ‘you are a world champion in social media’, then I can’t help but think ‘if I were a world champion in social media then I probably wouldn’t apply for a job here!’. If instead they had been more realistic and honest, and maybe even had a little self-irony, then I would be more interested in the position.”

Morten is not the only one who experiences that companies often resort to clichés in their job descriptions. A large study from Jobfisk.dk shows exactly this point. Similarly, according to the 311 job seekers who answered the survey, they judge companies by their ability to write clear and comprehensive job descriptions, and on average they rate them as mediocre.

Design is important

Morten’s usual procedure when applying for a job is to first check out the company’s website, Facebook and LinkedIn page: 

“I do this to get an impression of the company so that I can decide if I want to apply and how to best target my application.”

In this initial process, the visual elements of the companies are of great importance:

“If a website or job description looks nice, it just adds a little extra to my motivation to apply for the job. If, on the other hand, it is poorly made, I might be slightly hesitant and wonder ‘how professional are they?’ It’s important to me that I get a feel for the company in their job description – both in terms of text and design.”

Read more about why it pays off to think about the visual when recruiting: Value-based Recruitment Makes Sense – and Profit.

Transparency in the process, please!

When looking for a job, Morten more often that not receives confirmation that the application has been received. However, it sometimes lacks when it comes to the written rejections:

“Sometimes I end up wondering what happened to a given position I applied for. Then I might get a rejection three months later. Or sometimes not at all.”

Although it can be demotivating to read rejections, Morten still appreciates knowing where he stands and how far along the process the employer is:

“It is a pity to get a refusal, but then at least you can move on and focus on something new. It is also very nice when they write on the job description, or in the email following the application, when they are planning to hold the interviews. When that day comes, and you are still not called to an interview, you know that you probably won’t get that job.”

In addition to ongoing and relevant information, Morten appreciates when the recruitment processes are efficient:

“I appreciate it when the process doesn’t drag out and when I know what to expect.”

LinkedIn seminar med HR-ON om at rekruttere de rette medarbejdere

Seminar with LinkedIn: Give the Passive Candidates a Nudge

Seminar with LinkedIn: Give the Passive Candidates a Nudge 1200 628 HR-ON

More than 80 percent of LinkedIn’s users are not actively looking for a new job. In other words they are passive candidates. This was one among many facts that Benjamin Runggaldier, LinkedIn’s Enterprise Relationship Manager, presented to the numerous attendees at HR-ON’s seminar on Wednesday. 

In Denmark, more than 2.5 million people have a profile on LinkedIn. Benjamin Runggaldier emphasized that despite the high proportion of passive candidates, 90% of Danes are open to the “right” job opportunity.

Inspiring example

With this information in mind, companies must be creative in order to ensure their job postings on LinkedIn catch the attention of potential candidates – both passive and active.

There are several methods of getting through to candidates, one of which was presented in the form of a case study of Gentofte Municipality. Gentofte Municipality was handling a challenging recruitment process last year. Mikael Bierbaum, former Chief of HR at Gentofte Municipality presented this example.

With an extra boost and with the help of LinkedIn Premium Jobs, they succeeded in attracting the attention of some strong candidates. One candidate was Tine Jensen, who got the job. The campaign resulted in 33 applications for the leadership position. Up until that point Gentofte Municipality had only received seven applications of varying quality. Read more here.

Gentofte Kommune brugte LinkedIn Premium med et ekstra boost for at rekruttere en kandidat til en lederstilling
Tina Jensen, rektor for FGU Storkøbenhavn Nord, så den ledige stilling som rektor igen og igen på LinkedIn pga. jobannoncen var lagt på som Premium Job og boostet, hvilket gjorde udfaldet til, at hun søgte jobbet.

Tried and tested first hand

The Gentofte Municipality case was an eye-opener for many of the seminar attendees (roughly 80 people). HR-ON also presented the new function in their HR-system HR-ON Staff at the seminar. During the presentation, the attendees were asked to take out their phones and participate in a live quiz.

HR-ON also gave the attendees an introduction to the tool used to create the quiz. This tool can be used for many things, the sky’s the limit! The main proposed uses include onboarding and EDP-conversations, etc.

Ali Cevik til HR-ONs LinkedIN seminar
HR-ONs LinkedIN seminar
Trumfer fodbold sex

Does Soccer Trump Sex?

Does Soccer Trump Sex? 1200 628 HR-ON

In the upcoming years, HR and recruitment related work will undergo a major change, where machine learning and AI will increasingly become key tools for the HR employee and the recruiter.

This development creates simultaneously some great opportunities and some worrisome scenarios that will need to be addressed from this moment on.

In this post, I would like to address some of the perspectives one can/should take in relation to data-driven recruitment and HR. I will focus specifically on recruitment.

When collecting large amounts of data, it is natural to use the data to learn. The first step is to create statistics based on the collected data. The statistics tell us something about the past and provide answers only to the questions asked, if that.

The next step is the work on machine-learning, where one trains algorithms to find patterns in data, which one may not be aware of. It could be to identify various trends or to see connections that may not come to mind otherwise.

However, the fact that there is a connection, a correlation between different types of data, does not necessarily mean that there is also causality – that is causal relation.

Machine-learning can provide a basis for making future analyses and is therefore not limited to looking back at the past, like statistics.

Let’s talk a bit about data

When working with data, it is important to be clear that data does not necessarily say anything about reality or contain any truth. Data may be contaminated in many ways, and the way in which we put together the data may prove to be wrong and could ultimately have disastrous consequences.

It recently emerged that the data used in legal proceedings for the last 7 years may be faulty . Specifically, this means that people guilty of committing a crime may have gone free, and worse, that innocent people have been convicted by Danish courts. The Danish authorities are now beginning the huge task of reviewing thousands of cases. And the people effected by this scandal must now try and piece together their lives, which were destroyed along the way.

I recently attended an HR conference where a presenter told an immersive story about a football fan who had seen a very exciting match on television. And later the same night, he was with his girlfriend in more intimate conditions.

He was wearing a pulse-watch, and the data from this watch subsequently showed that his pulse had been faster during the soccer match, which was interpreted as him being more engaged in football than in intimate relations. In other words: Football trumps sex.

However, this may have just been a misinterpretation, because had the clock also measured the level of neurotransmitters in the brain, the conclusion might have been quite different. And furthermore, you could ask him yourself and perhaps get a third answer.

One must therefore constantly be critical of one’s data and how to use it.

Practical use in recruitment

When recruiting, you are of course interested in finding the right candidate. And in that process, you collect as much data and knowledge about the candidate as possible. There’s nothing wrong with that.

However, the more data you collect about a candidate, the greater the requirements it puts on the recruiter’s professional as well as ethical, social and empathetic skills.

One must be able to sort data and also to reject data that is interesting enough but not necessarily relevant in the specific context. At the same time, one must be able to take a critical view of the data used and pay attention to deficiencies and sources of error.

The fact remains that nothing can replace a personal meeting between people. In fact, the more data you have access to, the more important the personal meeting becomes.

And if the personal meeting with the candidate experiences a mismatch between what has been seen in his data and what the candidate produces, then first, you have to be critical of your data and method.

It could be said that the most important thing is that the recruiter’s level of competence must match the amount of data. The more data, the higher the level of compatibility required. And having more data it ideal because it will lead to a much more qualitative recruitment and greater likelihood of a good match for the benefit of both employees and companies.

The above, of course, takes its starting point in a humanist perspective and a desire on my part for an increased focus on the human factor during a data-driven time.

Something I personally think is becoming increasingly important as machines take over more and more of our tasks, and a wish I am not alone with, is one of the core areas of GDPR, where a part of automatic profiling has been made.

The only question left to answer is: does soccer really trump sex?

Christian Hansen

CTO, HR-ON.

Et katalog med en artikel der beskriver at gentofte har løst rekuteringsproblemet

Gentofte Municipality succeeds in collaborating with LinkedIn

Gentofte Municipality succeeds in collaborating with LinkedIn 1200 628 HR-ON

Gentofte Municipality invested in digital solutions and fixed their recruitment problem.

When the municipality of the town of Gentofte in Denmark was set with the task of recruiting a principal for the new preparatory school FGU Copenhagen North, it turned out to be a challenge. Recruitment was done across five municipalities, and one week before the application deadline, only a handful of applications had been received.

– Once we had launched the project we realised it was clearly a difficult position to fill – there were only a few applicants, says Mikael Bierbaum, HR Process Manager at Gentofte Municipality. Originally, he had expected around 10 qualified applicants, and he could see that that wasn’t going to happen.

– We decided to try a more proactive and targeted method that also reaches people who didn’t seem to be necessarily on the market. And then something started happening. We hadn’t expected such a significant reaction, he says.

Targeted campaign

Thanks to HR-ON’s direct integration with LinkedIn, they were able to deliver the solution in the form of a targeted LinkedIn Premium campaign. Gentofte Municipality decided to push the application deadline back slightly. The number of applications increased more than five fold. Mikael Bierbaum emphasizes that there were almost exclusively relevant applications:

– I wouldn’t have called it a success if the quality hadn’t been what we were looking for. Apart from one, all applications were within our expectations. These were serious applicants and we that meant we had a wider selection than anyone had expected.

Found the job on LinkedIn

The outcome of the process was that FGU Copenhagen North got the right candidate for the job. The new principal Tina Jensen first discovered the job when she saw the advertisement on LinkedIn.

Billede af Tina

Tina Jensen, Newly appointed Principal at FGU Copenhagen North

– LinkedIn is one of the first things I open in the morning when I sit and drink my coffee, she says.

As head of a local school, she was already aware that the position would appear, and she had been keeping an eye out for the job ad. When she saw the it pop up on LinkedIn, she decided to apply for the principal job. And both her and Mikael Bierbaum are very gla d she did.

Finding the right candidate

Mikael Bierbaum has said that in the future he will certainly use LinkedIn Premium via the HR-ON platform for positions that he knows in advance will be a challenge to fill. He will also try to fill other positions where the candidates may not be LinkedIn’s core users, but where LinkedIn’s wide reach may nonetheless provide the right candidates. Another advantage of this solution, according to Mikael, is that it is much cheaper than the alternatives:

– The price is important when working in the municipal sector, where the recruitment budget is sometimes down to a few thousand danish krone. It is a huge asset that we have access to this technology, and we are very confident about what we can use it for. Mikael Bierbaum HR-Process Manager, Gentofte Municipality
Medarbejder af gentofte kommune

First Danish partner agreement

LinkedIn Premium is part of the official partner agreement that HR-ON has signed with LinkedIn. HR-ON are the first system supplier in Denmark to be chosen by LinkedIn for this exclusive partnership. The agreement will ensure a more effective match between companies and their future employees.

Mikela Hedenros Ringart Enterprise Sales Leader, LinkedIn

Recruitment is changing. Previously, companies have sent traditional job adverts with the expectation that the candidates themselves would discover them. In the future, the ads themselves will target relevant candidates, says LinkedIn’s Manager of Nordic partner agreements, Mikaela Hedenros Ringart.

Medarbejder af hr-on

The agreement makes it possible for HR-ON’s customers to place their job ads directly on LinkedIn in the same workflow as other recruitment. On LinkedIn, algorithms keep track of job ads and automatically highlight them to relevant candidates. For growing companies, this collaboration with LinkedIn means that they will be able to target their jobs to specific people. And that is what Gentofte Municipality has benefited from, explains HR-ON’s Director Ali E. Cevik.

Effective recruitment channel

Through HR-ON, Ali E. Cevik has a deep insight into how to best advertise jobs and which methods work well. It all comes from the recruitment system’s statistics, which users also have access to, says Ali E. Cevik.

Forskellige computer enheder

Hacking the candidate journey

Hacking the candidate journey 1200 628 HR-ON

Redefine your recruitment strategy and take an omnichannel recruitment approach in order to create a memorable candidate journey.

The process of filling in a new job opening can be costly in terms of time and money. Recruiters have the challenge to find a candidate that masters the required skills, while fitting in the company culture. On the opposite side, candidates have challenges in finding the right fit for their career.

However, there is nothing more gratifying than the moment the process ends with a good match for both, recruiter and candidate.

The candidate journey

The candidate journey describes the road taken by a candidate that applies for a job.

As a recruiter you want to take into consideration all the touch points the candidate comes in contact with, and make sure you respond with consistency in all of them.

Step 1 – Awareness

It starts with the process of making the candidate aware of your company and your job openings. This stage is tricky to define. Because the active candidates might take the action to apply the moment they come in contact with your brand. For other candidates, it might take a lot of time and research before they make the decision to apply.

As a company, you are not in control as to which touch point the candidate first comes in contact with. But you can optimise you channels, so they are interconnected and your brand is omnipresent.

Delighting the candidates and give them a good and smooth candidate experience from the get go. This lets you develop relationships with your future candidates long before you will need them to apply for a job.

According to The Future Of Recruiting Study made by CareerArc, 64% of job seekers with a poor candidate experience would be less likely to make a purchase from that company. The bad experiences influence the present, but are also influencing their future consumer behavior.

Bad experiences also affect and influence candidates in other ways. The same study shows that 55% of job seekers that have read a negative review on the company decide to stop applying for the job. Having this information lets you take charge of your reviews, and the way you respond to them.

Step 2 – Consideration/interest

The second phase in the candidate journey is the consideration / interest phase. This is where the candidates gets converted into applying. During this phase the candidates have multiple interactions with your brand and employer brand.

Not all candidates will spend time to check you out and understand you company. However, around 69% of active candidates will take their time to do so. The candidates that are really interested in your company will do their research and try to grasp your culture from the available information. You want to meet them prepared and let your Employer Branding strategy charm them into taking the action of applying.

Step 3 – Application and hiring

The final phases in the candidate journey are application and hiring. The hiring process ends with these two phases. All the efforts taken in the initial phases will pay off when candidates need to take action and apply for the job.

All the previous phases will also determine the way they will apply. If they have a high interest in you, they will put an extra effort in their application, showing you how they are the best fit for your company.

For the candidate journey to be a successful and positive experience for all involved parts, you as a company can put in place a recruiting strategy.

 

Omnichannel recruiting strategy

Whether we are aware of it or not, omnichannel marketing is all around in our interaction with brands. This terminology is typically used in a marketing or retail sense. But why not be an innovator and apply this to the HR department?

The terminology, omnichannel marketing, means mixing all the touch points a customer goes through. Digital and interpersonal interaction and giving them a continuous experience.

Give the candidates a personalized and memorable experience across channels and devices, that align with your goals and culture in a form of flow of convenient interactions.

In a practical sense, it means that no matter the channel or touch point the candidate comes in contact with, their experience continues, rather than start over.

Think of it as of watching a movie on Netflix. You start on your tv, then when you open the app on your phone or tablet, and you can continue watching where you left off. This is exactly the kind of customer-centric approach you can use so that your company’s candidate journey. Make it as seamless as possible, while allowing companies to deliver a consistent and effective brand message. Thus aligning your recruitment strategy with consumer behaviour.

Consumer behaviour is influenced by a number of factors including marketing strategies, economic conditions, personal preferences and group preferences. Recruiters can tailor the recruitment strategy to optimise the reach of qualified potential employers and create a strong talent pool.

 

Key points

To sum up, think of all the touch points you have with your candidates and design a consistent communication flow, in order to give candidates a great candidate journey.

Your brand consistency represents the pattern of expression that determines the way your company is perceived by the outside world. So putting a extra effort in the way you present yourself will improve the candidates perception.

 

For more ideas for memorable experience and touch points with the younger generations, consider the following article: Recruit the best talent through video or explore our website here.

A person who is recording a concert on a mobile phone

Recruit the best talent through video

Recruit the best talent through video 1200 628 HR-ON

The recruitment process is growing more complex as our thirst for development increases in tact with technological progression. It is no surprise that we are focusing more and more on video content as studies show that in 2019, 80% of the world’s internet traffic will be driven by video. We are consuming more video material than ever before. Making it only a matter of time before all companies might recruit the best talent through video.

Big companies like Microsoft, Apple and Deloitte have been using video in their recruitment processes for years with great results. Both in terms of building brand awareness and candidate attraction. Now it’s time for smaller companies to get on board, or get left behind.

Start out with employer branding

Before you post a new job, work on your employer branding by marketing your company as a attractive workplace.

Define and write down the areas you want to show your uniqueness in. Build your employer branding and recruitment marketing in pursuance of showcasing your values and culture. Determine the future candidates profiles, and make a touch point analysis for the candidates journey.

Having a clear message in mind and a focused touch point interaction will help you be more specific and precise in your employer branding efforts. It’s a trial and error process. It is highly adjustable and helpful in pinpointing the marketing efforts that have a positive effect on your employer brand. While flushing out those that may harm your brand’s image.

The employees are a great asset. When they are satisfied with their workplace, have great employer experiences and believe in your values, they are willing to go the extra mile. This is seen in their daily tasks and in showing the whole world, that they are happy about being part of the company.

You can encourage your employees to be active brand ambassadors. By having a open policy where the individual is involved and informed about the happenings and direction the company is heading in. For example by organizing company events, as well as instigating the employees to come up with new ideas and be a part of content creation.

Cater to millennials

Design your employer branding strategy to also accommodate the future generation of candidates–millennials.

Direct your marketing efforts towards appealing to the younger generations. Focus on millennials, as they are becoming the main workforce. The job recruiting of the future needs to accommodate the needs of the new generation. The visibility and branding efforts that you are planning now, will have a impact on the perception the candidates will have about you and on which level you will appeal to them.

The type of content you want to share with the public needs to be relevant and interesting for the candidates, in form of text, pictures and of course video.

Your social media channels, job postings and your career page are a great place to exhibit your work environment. And a great channel to attract candidates that will fit and flourish in you company.

Offer video applications

You can take the usage of video to another level by including it throughout the candidate application process. Try thinking of ways you can recruit the best talent through video.

One simple example is having a team member describe the job posting in person, rather than a standard text posting. This gives candidates a sneak peak at what the job requires, who they would be working with, and what they can expect in such as role. This is far more engaging and effective way of engaging with the millenial job seeker. Especially if you are using social media as a distribution channel. 75% of millennials watches video on social media on a daily basis.

Another example, and a long-standing feature of HR-ON, is allowing candidates to submit a video. This could be the entirety of their application or in response to specific application questions. Today the majority of job seekers are browsing for jobs on their phones. Some even looking specifically for positions that allow for easy mobile submission. Why not give yourself a chance to recruit the best talent through video? So give these individuals the option to record a quick video, and you are more likely to have them consider the role rather than pass it right by.

While these are two simple examples of using video in the application process, there are sure to be others out there. Get creative! The objective here is to think like the candidate and make the process fun and engaging. In doing so, you will be on the right track to recruiting the best talent, building great teams, and telling the full story of what your organization is all about.

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How GDPR affects recruitment and job adverts

How GDPR affects recruitment and job adverts 1200 628 HR-ON

The new GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation) affects recruitment and job advertising. Here is some information to help you get ahead in your recruitment efforts.

Article updated in May 2018.

GDPR is changing the way companies recruit – this is generally good, but it will increase the complexity of online recruitment for some companies. In this article, we will focus on what you need to ask in your job postings and what data you must collect from potential candidates in the future when the new Personal Data Regulation enters into force at the end of this week, on May 25, 2018.

You will find answers to the following questions regarding online recruitment:

  • What kind of data will be allowed in recruitment?
  • What are you allowed to ask your candidates according to GDPR?
  • How to avoid unwanted information?
  • What you should be able to document for data protection?

WHAT DOES THE NEW GENERAL DATA PROTECTION REGULATION ALLOW?

In reality, there is not a big difference in the kind of data you are allowed to collect before and after the General Data Protection Regulation. The key difference is in your documentation and in the processing of data.

Therefore, you can expect some extra work in the processes before and after the collection of data. For example, it is necessary to argue the reason behind the collection of certain kinds of data in connection with recruitment.

Therefore, as a recruitment officer, you need to cast a critical look at the data you collect about your candidates.

A CRITICAL EYE FOR YOUR VACANCIES

Not all the knowledge and data you collect is relevant to evaluate the best candidate for a specific job vacancy.

With the new Personal Data Regulation you need to look at the application form(s) you use and answer the following questions:

  • Are all questions relevant to find the right candidate?
  • Do you collect sensitive information?
  • Have you documented your assessment and positioning of the above?

When the General Data Protection Regulation comes into force on Friday, it is important, that you have thought about and implemented these questions in your recruitment routine, so your online recruitment process meets the requirements of GDPR. It is very important to understand how GDPR affects your recruitment and to make changes to accommodate the new rules.

Try the risk assessment tool provided by HR-ON.

IMPORTANT KNOWLEDGE OR INDIFFERENT INFORMATION?

To start with the first question, it is important that you do not have unnecessary questions on your application form.

Is it still relevant to know your applicant’s place of residence, or is it a superfluous information that can be substituted with the candidate’s general zip-code, to know if they live nearby? Most people already communicate by phone or e-mail, so you probably do not need to send a letter to any of your candidates via mail.

Place of residence is, therefore, in most cases, an example of unnecessary information from your applicants.

When the General Data Protection Regulation comes into force on May 25th, it is important that you expound the information and data, that you gather from candidates. The Data Protection Agency will be critical to both redundant and useless data collection from candidates, which can be at risk – especially if there is sensitive information among them.

Which leads us to the next important point.

WHAT KINDS OF DATA DOES THE GDPR ALLOW YOU TO COLLECT AND STORE?

In the European Regulation, it is distinguished between two kinds of personal data: general information and sensitive information.

The level of data security and documentation depends on the type of data you want to collect. Especially your measures in case of data breaches and leaks.

Examples of the two different kinds of personal data can be seen in the table:

General information Sensitive information
  • Name
  • Address
  • E-mail
  • Prior offenses
  • Passport, drivers license etc.
  • Journal number
  • Racial or ethnic background
  • Political, religious or philosophical beliefs
  • Professional memberships
  • Health as well as sexual relations or orientation
  • Social security number (Has a grade outside of scale)

If you only want to collect just general information, it makes sense to obtain a so-called ISO 27001 certification.

You can read about ISO 27001 certification here.

As a general rule, you should only collect common information, as sensitive information has much higher information security requirements.

GDPR REQUIRES DOCUMENTATION

One of the most important points in the new GDPR in relation to recruitment, is documentation.

In order to be GDPR-compliant with your questions in the job post, it is important that you not only have a critical look at the data and questions you ask your applicants , but you must also prove that you have been critical of them.

In practice, this means, that you will need a handbook or documented guidelines for questions, which you can refer to if the Personal Data Agency comes knocking.

For many recruiters, it will therefore make sense to use standardized questions in job vacancies. This will help avoid documentation and argumentation for data collection in all job listings and posts.

HOW DO I AVOID SENSITIVE INFORMATION?

Now you know, what you are allowed to ask your candidates and how to document your recruitment process.

But your applicants can still send you sensitive information through mail or your recruitment system. And that can actually become a problem for you. According to the General Data Protection Regulation, you are still obliged to take measures to ensure that you do not receive sensitive information from people.

In the vast majority of cases, it will be sufficient to point out that you do not want to receive your applicants’ sensitive information.

In other cases it’s hard to get rid of them; for example on exam papers, which almost always have the social security number printed on them.

But since HR-ON’s main aim is to make recruitment easier, we have implemented technical solutions that can automatically sort out the sensitive information. Hopefully this article will help you and your business understand GDPR and how it affects recruitment.

Read about the future of e-recruitment here get a demo before the GDPR is coming into force on May 25, 2018.